Subject: Roger Pryor and Grace Bradley on sale for limited time




TODAY'S SPECIAL

Sitting On The Moon (1936)
Starring Roger Pryor and Grace Bradley

Beautiful print and will play in all DVD players.
At their best, the Republic musicals of the 1930s could hold their own against anything turned out by MGM or Warner Bros. Republic's Sitting on the Moon is an excellent showcase for second-echelon stars Roger Pryor and Grace Bradley, here cast as songwriter Danny West and fading movie star Polly Blair. Hoping to jump-start Polly's career, Danny breaks up his partnership with lyricist Mike (William Newell), who finds some comfort in the arms of Polly's wisecracking pal Mattie (Pert Kelton). Hoping to tear Danny away from Polly, Mike contrives to have blonde seductress Blossom (Joyce Compton) pretend to be Mike's sweetheart, but all misunderstandings are forgotten during the climactic musical production numbers.
Director: Ralph Staub

Writers: Raymond L. Schrock (screenplay), Rex Taylor (adaptation), Sidney Sutherland, Julian Field

Stars: Roger Pryor, Grace Bradley, William Newell, Pert Kelton, Henry Kolker, Henry Wadsworth, Joyce Compton, The Theodores, Jimmy Ray
Songs include:

Sitting on the Moon
Written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Sam H. Stept
Performed by Roger Pryor on piano
Later sung by Grace Bradley with orchestra
Also played over the opening titles

Lost In My Dreams
Written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Sam H. Stept
Performed by Roger Pryor

How Am I Doin' With You
Written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Sam H. Stept
Performed by Roger Pryor

Who Am I?
Written by Sidney D. Mitchell and Sam H. Stept
Sung by Grace Bradley, with Roger Pryor on piano

Theme from Tannhauser
Music by Richard Wagner
Performed (as a rag) by Roger Pryor on piano

The aircraft Danny flies to New York appears to be a Vultee V-1A.
Made in 1936, Republic Studio's second year of operation. It was produced by Nat Levine who from 1927-35 owned his own studio called Mascot Pictures. He was a very successful producer of serials and had been merged against his will with Monogram Pictures to form Republic Pictures. Everyone owed despotic Herbert J Yates money and he owned the film processing factory they all used: Consolidated film laboratories...so he foreclosed on the most successful small studios and got their expertise, libraries and crews. In this merger, Yates made Levine head of production at Republic. This film is one of their earliest collaborations.
Levine left Republic when Yates offered him $1,000,000 for his share in the business. Within a year Levine blew it all at the racetrack and was broke. I wish Scorscese could make this story in the same way he covered Hughes in The AVIATOR. Levine was only 38 when he was washed up. He managed a cinema after that and died in the 80s. Incredible. Yates paid himself a million dollars each year for 25 years for running Republic. $20,000 a week in the 30s and 40s!
The music is much, much better than the film - potential A-level material. And it gets a good treatment, especially during the last song, as Grace Bradley starts out a Capella when the orchestra leader rushes out. I like Grace Bradley very much. She's very pretty without trying to appear precious or overly sweet. There's a modern quality in her, and her voice - both when she speaks and when she sings - is top quality.
Order this rarely-seen and hard-to-find classic today for the low price of $5.99.
New Additions At Zeus:
Bright Lights (1935)

Stars: Joe E. Brown, Ann Dvorak, Patricia Ellis, William Gargan, Joseph Cawthorn, Henry O'Neill, Arthur Treacher, William Demarest, The Maxellos

Joe E. Brown's extensive circus and burlesque training serve him well in this familiar but likeable yarn. Brown and Ann Dvorak stars as small-time vaudevillians Joe and Fay Wilson, presently employed by a seedy burlesque troupe. Also on tour with the Wilsons is society girl Peggy (Patricia Ellis), who's merely joined the troupe for a few laughs. Publicity agent Daniel Wheeler (William Gargan) offers Joe a big-time contract, but only if he will team up with Peggy. Surprisingly, Fay goes along with this, though she soon has reason to regret her generosity. The film's many intrigues give way to slapstick when Joe commandeers an airplane to expedite a reconciliation with his ever-loving spouse. The film's comic highlight is Joe E. Brown's "drunken mouse" routine, which later caused him courtroom trouble when comedian Bert Wheeler insisted that the bit was his personal property.
Bright Road (1953)

Stars: Dorothy Dandridge, Philip Hepburn, Harry Belafonte, Barbara Randolph, Robert Horton, Maidie Norman

Bright Road was a real rarity in 1953: a major-studio production with an all-black cast. Based on an award-winning short story by Mary Elizabeth Vroman, the film is largely set at a rural black school in an unspecified Southern community. Idealistic new fourth-grade teacher Jane Richards (Dorothy Dandridge) makes it her mission in life to "reach" troublesome failing student C. T. Young (Philip Hepburn). Just when Jane and the boy are making progress, tragedy strikes, plunging C. T. into the depths of depression and defeatism. But with the help of the school's compassionate principal (Harry Belafonte), Jane is able to get C. T. back on the right track--and as a bonus, the boy becomes an unexpected hero in a moment of crisis. Handled in a leisurely, understated fashion, Bright Road represents perhaps the best directorial effort of Gerald Mayer, MGM's resident "keeper of the 'B's" in the 1950s. Best scene: C. T.'s euphoric reaction upon earning a passing grade for the first time in his life.

Brighton Rock (1948)

Stars: Richard Attenborough, Hermione Baddeley, William Hartnell, Harcourt Williams, Wylie Watson, Nigel Stock

This unsparing, brutal look at the British criminal underbelly stars Richard Attenborough as Pinkie Brown, a pock-marked gang leader. While leading his men in a racetrack robbery, Pinkie kills a man. He convinces pretty waitress Rose (Carol Marsh) to provide him with an alibi, promising to marry her in exchange. After the wedding, the sociopathic Pinkie conducts a slow and careful campaign to drive his young wife to suicide. A moody, well-acted film with a stunning performance by the 24-year-old Attenborough, Brighton Rock is notable for bringing a new vicious realism to British crime cinema. Adapted by Terrance Rattigan and Graham Greene, from Greene's novel, the screenplay is superlative. The grim realism and sordid subject matter of the film is striking, handled by twin filmmakers Roy and John Boulting, who use mood and dark, stark photography to convey an almost palpable sense of dread. The American distributor of Brighton Rock, smelling disaster with that ambivalent title, renamed the film Young Scarface, and while it was quite controversial in its day, the film can't quite recapture the impact it had upon its initial release.
Bring 'Em Back A Wife (1933)

Stars: Ben Blue, Billy Gilbert, James C. Morton, Geneva Mitchell

When Billy must prove that he's married in order to keep his job, he disguises Ben in drag in an attempt to pass him off as the little woman.
Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia (1974)

Stars: Warren Oates, Isela Vega, Robert Webber, Gig Young, Helmut Dantine, Emilio Fernandez, Kris Kristofferson

Wealthy Mexican Emilio Fernandez puts a million-dollar bounty on the head of Alfredo Garcia, who has seduced and knocked up Fernandez's daughter. Trouble is, Alfredo Garcia is already dead and buried. Barkeep Bennie (Warren Oates) is appointed by two of Fernandez's hit men (Robert Webber and Gig Young) to travel to the small town in whose cemetery Garcia is interred, planning to dig up the body and recover the head; along the way, he meets and falls for prostitute Elita (Isela Vega), who had become involved with Garcia. But these two fail to anticipate the arrival of fellow corpse-seekers, equally desperate to collect the bounty.

Bringing Up Baby (1938)

Stars: Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Charles Ruggles, Walter Catlett, Barry Fitzgerald, May Robson

Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant star in this inspired comedy about a madcap heiress with a pet leopard who meets an absent-minded paleontologist and unwittingly makes a fiasco of both their lives. David Huxley (Grant) is the stuffy paleontologist who needs to finish an exhibit on dinosaurs and thus land a $1 million grant for his museum. At a golf outing with his potential benefactors, Huxley is spotted by Susan Vance (Hepburn) who decides that she must have the reserved scientist at all costs. She uses her pet leopard, Baby, to trick him into driving to her Connecticut home, where a dog wanders into Huxley's room and steals the vital last bone that he needs to complete his project. The real trouble begins when another leopard escapes from the local zoo and Baby is mistaken for it, leading Huxley and Susan into a series of harebrained and increasingly more insane schemes to save the cat from the authorities. Inevitably, the two end up in the local jail, where things get even more out of hand: Susan pretends to be the gun moll to David's diabolical, supposedly wanted criminal. Naturally, the mismatched pair falls in love through all the lunacy. Director Howard Hawks delivers a funny, fast-paced, and offbeat story, enlivened by animated performances from the two leads, in what has become a definitive screwball comedy.
Featured Films

Under The Red Robe (1937)

Famed Swedish director Victor Sjostrom was coaxed out of retirement to direct his final film, Under the Red Robe, a swashbuckling adventure that takes place in the France of Louis XIII. Conrad Veidt stars as Gil de Berault, quick with his sword yet set for execution. But right before his sentence is carried out, Cardinal Richelieu (Raymond Massey) offers a stay of execution if Gil will find and kill a duke suspected of leading the revolutionary antimonarchist Huguenots. Gil tracks the duke to a castle, sneaks into the guarded fortress, and ends up falling in love with the duke's sister, Lady Marguerite (Anabella). Gil now has to save the duke without bringing about his own execution. Conrad Veidt, Annabella, Raymond Massey, Romney Brent, Sophie Stewart, Wyndham Goldie
James Garner
"I'm a Spencer Tracy-type actor. His idea was to be on time, know your words, hit your marks and tell the truth. Most every actor tries to make it something it isn't looks for the easy way out. I don't think acting is that difficult if you can put yourself aside and do what the writer wrote."

Erik Aaes
Art Director

Gerald Drayson Adams
Screenwriter

Julie Adams
No matter what you do, you can act your heart out, but people will always say, "Oh, Julie Adams - Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)."

Mario Adorf

Franklin Adreon
Director

Adrian
Costume designer
"When the glamour goes for Garbo, it goes for me as well." - the reason Adrian gave for leaving MGM.

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