Subject: Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Kathryn Crawford on sale for limited time




TODAY'S SPECIAL

Safety In Numbers (1930)
Starring Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Kathryn Crawford

Beautiful print and will play in all DVD players.
In this lightweight musical comedy, an aspiring songwriter tries to make it big on Broadway. Later his uncle decides to show him all about the world and so hires three gorgeous show girls to take him around the Big Apple. All three of the opportunistic young lasses find themselves attracted to the man; of course it doesn't hurt that he is heir to $350 million. He does choose one of them.
Director: Victor Schertzinger

Writers: Marion Dix (story), George Marion Jr. (screenplay), Percy Heath

Stars: Charles 'Buddy' Rogers, Kathryn Crawford, Josephine Dunn, Carole Lombard, Roscoe Karns, Richard Tucker, Francis McDonald, Louise Beavers
Songs include:

My Future Just Passed
by Richard A. Whiting and George Marion Jr.
Sung by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Kathryn Crawford

Business Girl
by Richard A. Whiting and George Marion Jr.

Do You Play, Madam?
by Richard A. Whiting and George Marion Jr.
Sung by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Kathryn Crawford
Reprised by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers

I'd Like to Be a Bee in Your Boudoir
by Richard A. Whiting and George Marion Jr.
Sung by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Josephine Dunn
Reprised by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers

Pepola
by Richard A. Whiting and George Marion Jr.
Sung by Chorus

The Pick-Up
by Richard A. Whiting and George Marion Jr.
Sung by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers, Kathryn Crawford, Louise Beavers and Chorus

You Appeal to Me
by Richard A. Whiting and George Marion Jr.
Sung by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and Carole Lombard
Reprised by Charles 'Buddy' Rogers

Here's that rare combination of intelligent direction, brilliant dialogue, and rich humor. The result is a picture that is entertainment plus.
"The Pick Up" is terrific as it swings through the intro, a trombone solo by Rogers, and an astonishing bit by Louise Beavers (as the maid Messalina). I have never heard her sing before. The song ends with a chorus line of silhouettes dancing in front of a spinning New York skyline. An amazing number.
"Safety In Numbers" makes you wonder if Buddy Rogers' career would have gained more momentum had it been filmed in, say, 1934-5, after the clunkiness of early sound-on-film technology had been ironed out. This was clearly meant to be a showcase for Rogers, and he certainly makes the most of his musical opportunities, singing in every number except "You Appeal To Me." Come to think of it, NOBODY sings "You Appeal To Me," because Carole Lombard could not sing, choosing instead to speak the lyrics over the orchestral accompaniment. But Rogers zips through his songs, even playing the drums and piano at one point, not to mention a wicked trombone solo during "The Pick-Up." The only problem seems to be whether or not Rogers is meant to be a libertine or a sweet guy - clearly his uncle imagines him to be a jazz-and-sex crazed rogue, but Rogers' sweet pan and wholesome, charming personality suggest nothing more decadent than a high school football captain slightly intoxicated on grandma's elderberry wine.
Regardless, the film is a risqué romp through an early Depression garden of opportunities to see young women in their underthings for extended periods of time (Rogers ingenuously asks one of the girls what a bra is - she answers: "A ping-pong net." He deadpans: "I love ping-pong.") It's difficult to tell Carole Lombard and Josephine Dunn apart in long shot, but up close (and when they opens their mouths), it's clear that Lombard had an edge on Dunn in terms of comedy and timing. Both Dunn and Crawford were forgotten by the mid-thirties; the former's blandness and the latter's staginess probably did nothing to contribute to their longevity.
Order this rarely-seen and hard-to-find classic today for the low price of $5.99.
New Additions At Zeus:
Break Of Hearts (1935)

Stars: Katharine Hepburn, Charles Boyer, John Beal, Jean Hersholt, Sam Hardy, Inez Courtney, Helene Millard

Katharine Hepburn suffers nobly while her philandering conductor husband Charles Boyer dallies with the likes of Helene Millard in this overheated melodrama directed by Philip Moeller of the renowned Theater Guild. Although receiving plenty of warning, prim lady composer Constance Roberti (Hepburn) is still devastated when her new husband, Franz (Boyer), is spotted dining with glamorous Sylvia (Millard) and promptly leaves him. A dipsomaniac, Roberti finds solace in a bottle and is soon reduced to playing in a seedy dive. Constance finds him there and after playing "their song" on the honky-tonk, Roberti resolves to go straight and return to the world of classical music.
Breakdown (1952)

Stars: Ann Richards, William Bishop, Anne Gwynne, Sheldon Leonard, Wally Cassell, Richard Benedict

Low-budget Realart Films managed to pick up an above-average property when it secured the screen rights to the Robert Abel play The Samson Slasher. Retitled Breakdown, the story concerns a heavyweight boxer, played by William Bishop. Framed for murder, Bishop is sent to prison, but is released after a few years on good behavior. Putting two and two together (no mean feat when you're wearing boxing gloves), Bishop surmises that the real killer is linked up in some way with his girl friend Anne Gwynne. Richard Benedict, a real-life boxer who turned actor in the mid-1940s, appears in the supporting cast as "Punchy."

Amateur Daddy (1932)

Stars: Warner Baxter, Marian Nixon, Rita La Roy, William Pawley, Lucille Powers, David Landau, Clarence Wilson, Frankie Darro

Mildred Cram's novel Scotch Valley was transformed by the scenarists at Fox into the Warner Baxtervehicle Amateur Daddy. Baxter plays a true-blue sort who agrees to take care of the family of dying pal Edwin Stanley. While his neighbors make cruel fun of Baxter's efforts to play surrogate father, he does an admirable job. Baxter's resolve to do right is put to the test when a stranger shows up, claiming to be the family's "genuine" father. Marian Nixon plays the oldest and prettiest member of Baxter's foster family; her presence smooths the path for a romantic finale.
Breakdown (1955)

Stars: Joseph Cotten, Raymond Bailey, Forrest Stanley, Harry Shannon, Lane Chandler, Aaron Spelling

Mr. Callew, a demanding businessman, is resting by the beach when he receives a telephone call from a recently discharged employee. The man is in tears, but the unyielding Callew shows no sympathy, and hangs up on him. Later, when Callew starts to drive home, his car runs off the road at a construction site. When he comes to, Callew is paralyzed. Several persons come by, but he is unable to communicate with them, so they think he is dead. Fully aware of his predicament, he becomes increasingly terrified.
Breaker! Breaker! (1977)

Stars: Chuck Norris, George Murdock, Terry O'Connor, Don Gentry

A typical Chuck Norris vehicle from the late '70s, Breaker! Breaker! is neither the first nor the last Hollywood attempt to translate the wide appeal of trucking into big-screen profits. Alhough, it is probably the least successful. In this "modern" Western, a small California town is ruled by the nefarious Judge Josh. Using CB technology, the Judge and his gang of henchman lure wayward truckers into their town in order to do them bodily harm. Eventually their evil ways catch up to them in the form of J.D. Dawes (Norris), who comes in search of his brother. What he finds, however, is nothing a little Tae Kwan Do and a case of dynamite can't fix.

Breakfast At Tiffany's (1961)

Stars: Audrey Hepburn, George Peppard, Patricia Neal, Buddy Ebsen, Martin Balsam, John McGiver, Mickey Rooney

In an idealized New York City during the early '60s, Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) is a charming socialite with a youthful zest for life who lives alone in a nearly bare apartment. She has such a flippant lifestyle that she won't even give her cat a name, because that would be too much of a commitment to a relationship. Maintaining a childlike innocence yet wearing the most perfect of designer clothes and accessories from Givenchy, she spends her time on expensive dates and at high-class parties. She escorts various wealthy men, yet fails to return their affections after they have given her gifts and money. Holly's carefree independence is changed when she meets her neighbor, aspiring writer Paul (George Peppard), who is suffering from writer's block while being kept by a wealthy woman (Patricia Neal). Just when Holly and Paul are developing their sweet romance, Doc (Buddy Ebsen) appears on the scene and complicates matters, revealing the truth about Holly's past. Breakfast at Tiffany's was nominated for several Academy awards, winning Best Score for Henry Mancini and Best Song for Johnny Mercer's classic tune "Moon River".
Featured Films

Jivaro (1954)

In this adventure, four explorers search for a vast treasure in the Amazon jungle. One of the explorers is a woman who got involved after she traveled from California to marry her fiance whom she hasn't seen in two years. Another man tries to convince her that her fiance has become an alcoholic idealist obsessed with finding gold in the jungle. Another takes her into the jungle to find her love. En route he falls in love with her. Later they learn that her fiance has been killed by the Jivaro headhunters. The other man, who went in before them is also attacked, but the woman's guide saves his life. This film did not use stock footage. Much of it was actually filmed in the jungle to provide the backgrounds. Fernando Lamas, Rhonda Fleming, Brian Keith, Lon Chaney Jr., Richard Denning, Rita Moreno, Marvin Miller
James Garner
"I'm a Spencer Tracy-type actor. His idea was to be on time, know your words, hit your marks and tell the truth. Most every actor tries to make it something it isn't looks for the easy way out. I don't think acting is that difficult if you can put yourself aside and do what the writer wrote."

Erik Aaes
Art Director

Edie Adams
(on falling in love with Ernie Kovacs) Here was this guy with the big moustache, the big cigar, and the silly hat. I thought, "I don't know what this is, but it's for me."

Gerald Drayson Adams
Screenwriter

Julie Adams
No matter what you do, you can act your heart out, but people will always say, "Oh, Julie Adams - Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954)."

Nick Adams
I dreamed all my life of being a movie star. Movies were my life. You had to have an escape when you were raised in a basement. I saw all the James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart and John Garfield pictures. Odds against the world ... that was my meat.

Buddy Adler
Producer

Luther Adler

John G. Adolfi
Director

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