Subject: Damaso Perez Prado and Mary Kaye on sale for limited time




TODAY'S SPECIAL

Cha-Cha-Cha Boom! (1956)
Starring Damaso Perez Prado and Mary Kaye

Beautiful print and will play in all DVD players.
Director: Fred F. Sears
Writers: Robert E. Kent (story), Robert E. Kent (screenplay)

Stars: Perez Prado And His Orchestra, Mary Kaye Trio, The Judd Conlon Group, Helen Grayco, Luis Arcaraz and His Orchestra, Lucerito Barcenas, Manny Lopez and His Orchestra, Stephen Dunne, Alix Talton, Sylvia Lewis, Dante DiPaolo, Bernie Lowe and His Orchestra
Songs include:

Year 'Round Love
Written by Rose Marie McCoy, and Charles Singleton

Crazy Crazy
Music by Dámaso Pérez Prado

Mambo No. 8
Music by Dámaso Pérez Prado

Que Rico El Mambo
Music by Dámaso Pérez Prado

Voodoo Suite
Music by Dámaso Pérez Prado

La niña Popoff
Written by Dámaso Pérez Prado, Albrecht Marcuse and Aguste G. Schmutz

Cuban Rock and Roll
Music by Dámaso Pérez Prado

El Marinero
Written by Ricardo Rico

Lonesome Road
Music by Nathaniel Shilkret
Lyrics by Gene Austin
Performed by the Mary Kaye Trio

Get Happy
Music by Harold Arlen
Lyrics by Ted Koehler
Performed by the Mary Kaye Trio

Lilly's Lament (to Cell 29)
Written by Frances Maurine Barris, Robert Wells, Jack Allison and Loyce Whiteman
Performed by Helen Grayco

Save Your Sorrow
Lyrics by Buddy G. DeSylva
Music by Al Sherman

Diosa
Written by Manny Lopez and Jorge Hernández

Mi musica es para ti
Written by Rene Touzet

Gelatina
Written by Carlos Molina and Alvaro Escobar

Lucero
Written by Carlos Molina and Alvaro Escobar

Theme from Picnic
Music by George Duning
It was the immediate follow-up to Rock Around the Clock (actress Alix Talton appeared in both films).
Singer Helen Grayco, who was married to band leader Spike Jones, made her film debut in Cha-Cha-Cha Boom!
Oddly enough, the standout number is the non-Latin Mary Kaye Trio doing a swinging version of Lonesome Road.
Considered “missing” for nearly 20 years.
Order this rarely-seen and hard-to-find classic today for the low price of $5.99.
New Additions At Zeus:
Beyond Tomorrow (1940)

Stars: Harry Carey, C. Aubrey Smith, Charles Winninger

Harry Carey Sr., C. Aubrey Smith and Charles Winninger play three wealthy bachelors who have spent their lives wrapped up in themselves. Left all alone on Christmas eve, the elderly trio invite a couple of strangers to dinner: misplaced cowpoke Richard Carlson and pretty, but aimless, Jean Parker. Hoping that they've accomplished a bit of matchmaking, the three old duffers board a plane and head off to an important business meeting. The plane crashes, killing all three men. They return to their mansion as ghosts, only to discover that Carlson is making the same mistake they made: he's allowing his drive for success to override his affection for Parker. Feeling as though they won't be welcome in Heaven until they rectify this situation, Carey, Smith, and Winninger stick around to set things right.
Androcles And The Lion (1952)

Stars: Jean Simmons, Victor Mature, Alan Young

With George Bernard Shaw safely in his grave, RKO chief Howard Hughes had no qualms about twisting and bending Shaw's Androcles & the Lion to accommodate his own notions of entertainment. Happier, wiser heads prevailed before the Hughes-commissioned "Vestal Virgins" sequence, complete with near-naked dancing girls, was foisted on the public. Originally, Harpo Marx was to have played Androcles, the simple-hearted Christian tailor whose friendship with a lion saves himself and his friends from martyrdom in the Roman Colosseum. A few days into shooting, however, Harpo was replaced by Alan Young, who was okay but not in Marx's league. RKO habitués Jean Simmons and Victor Mature co-star as, respectively, a courageous Christian girl and the bullheaded Roman captain who falls in love with her. Every Shaw play has one character who acts as the playwright's alter ego; in Androcles, it's none other than Caesar himself, here wittily essayed by Maurice Evans. Director Chester Erskine co-adapted the play for the screen with Ken Englund; serving as producer was Gabriel Pascal.
Convicted (1931)

Stars: Aileen Pringle, Jameson Thomas, Dorothy Christy

Seldom was there a less appropriately named film company than Artclass Pictures, a firm which specialized in the lowest of low-budget productions. In Artclass's Convicted, silent-film favorite Aileen Pringle plays Barbara Norvelle, a stage actress who is being ardently pursued all over an ocean liner by her "sugar daddy" John Blair (Richard Tucker). Not long after being turned down for the umpteenth time by Barbara, Blair is found murdered, and the thousands of dollars that he has absconded with from his company appears to have been stolen. Not surprisingly, Barbara is accused of the murder, but a sharp-eyed reporter (Jameson Thomas) suspects that someone else was responsible. He's right, but it takes him the rest of the picture (all 55 minutes' worth) to prove it.
The Common Law (1931)

Stars: Constance Bennett, Joel McCrea, Lew Cody

A wealthy man's mistress abandons her luxurious life as a kept woman to be with the struggling Paris artist she has come to love in this third version of Robert W. Chambers' novel. It all began when she agreed to be his model. Soon they fall in love, and she decides to dump her rich old sugar daddy. Unfortunately, her relationship with the artist is tempestuous, and matters aren't helped by her former lover who tries to sabotage them at every turn. Though the artist wants to marry her, the woman isn't interested because he is too Bohemian and irresponsible. Fortunately, it all turns out to be an act and thanks to pressure from his conservative American family, marital bliss ensues.
Gone With The Wind (1939)

Stars: Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Thomas Mitchell

Gone With the Wind boils down to a story about a spoiled Southern girl's hopeless love for a married man. Producer David O. Selznick managed to expand this concept, and Margaret Mitchell's best-selling novel, into nearly four hours' worth of screen time, on a then-astronomical 3.7-million-dollar budget, creating what would become one of the most beloved movies of all time. Gone With the Wind opens in April of 1861, at the palatial Southern estate of Tara, where Scarlett O'Hara (Vivien Leigh) hears that her casual beau Ashley Wilkes (Leslie Howard) plans to marry "mealy mouthed" Melanie Hamilton (Olivia de Havilland). Despite warnings from her father (Thomas Mitchell) and her faithful servant Mammy (Hattie McDaniel), Scarlett intends to throw herself at Ashley at an upcoming barbecue at Twelve Oaks. Alone with Ashley, she goes into a fit of histrionics, all of which is witnessed by roguish Rhett Butler (Clark Gable), the black sheep of a wealthy Charleston family, who is instantly fascinated by the feisty, thoroughly self-centered Scarlett: "We're bad lots, both of us." The movie's famous action continues from the burning of Atlanta (actually the destruction of a huge wall left over from King Kong) through the now-classic closing line, "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn." Holding its own against stiff competition (many consider 1939 to be the greatest year of the classical Hollywood studios), Gone With the Wind won ten Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, Best Actress (Vivien Leigh), and Best Supporting Actress (Hattie McDaniel, the first African-American to win an Oscar). The film grossed nearly 192 million dollars, assuring that, just as he predicted, Selznick's epitaph would be "The Man Who Made Gone With the Wind."
The Magic Christian (1969)

Stars: Peter Sellers, Ringo Starr, Isabel Jeans

This zany British comedy finds a homeless hobo (Ringo Starr) being adopted by the world's richest man, Sir Guy Grand (Peter Sellers). Setting sail on the luxury liner The Magic Christian, Sir Grand tests the limit of human avarice. With money to motivate the greedy, Laurence Harvey combines his Hamlet soliloquy with a striptease. A vile cesspool of excrement is seeded with cash and the money-hungry dive right in. Wilfred Hyde White is the drunken captain, Yul Brynner is uncredited in his performance as a chanteuse transvestite, and John Cleese is the director of Sotheby's auction house. Roman Polanski, Richard Attenborough and Raquel Welch also appear in this offbeat comedy. Paul McCartney wrote and produced "Come and Get It," the first international hit from the power-pop group Badfinger. John "Speedy" Keene wrote "Something In The Air" and performed the track with his group Thunderclap Newman. Sellers, Cleese, Graham Chapman and Terry Southern co-authored the screenplay taken from Southern's novel.
Keir Dullea

Humphrey Bogart

Burt Lancaster

Alan Ladd

Marlon Brando

Jean Simmons

Shirley MacLaine

Diana Dors

Dick Clark

Dick Simmons

Dinah Shore

Kris Kristofferson

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