Subject: Jeanne Crain and Cornel Wilde on sale for limited time




TODAY'S SPECIAL

Centennial Summer (1946)
Starring Jeanne Crain and Cornel Wilde

Beautiful print and will play in all DVD players.
Otto Preminger directed this romantic musical (something of a change of pace for the rather serious-minded director) set in Philadelphia in 1876. The upcoming Centennial Exposition is the talk of the town, and sisters Julia (Jeanne Crain) and Edith (Linda Darnell) find themselves romantic rivals when they both fall for Philippe (Cornel Wilde), a suave Frenchman in town for the celebration. Their mother Harriet (Dorothy Gish) might offer more advice if she weren't busy looking after her husband Jesse (Walter Brennan), who is busy tinkering with inventions that he's convinced will make him a rich man. Jerome Kern composed the film's'score and co-wrote several songs. It was the last film work he would complete prior to his death in 1945.
Director: Otto Preminger
Writers: Michael Kanin, Albert E. Idell

Stars: Jeanne Crain, Cornel Wilde, Linda Darnell, William Eythe, Walter Brennan, Constance Bennett, Dorothy Gish, Barbara Whiting, Larry Stevens, Kathleen Howard, Avon Long, Florida Sanders
Academy Awards, USA 1947

Nominee

Best Music, Original Song
Jerome Kern (music)
Oscar Hammerstein II (lyrics)
For the song "All Through the Day".

Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Picture
Alfred Newman

Songs include:

The Right Romance
Music by Jerome Kern
Lyrics by Jack Yellen
Sung by Jeanne Crain (dubbed by Louanne Hogan)

Up with the Lark
Music by Jerome Kern
Lyrics by Leo Robin
Sung by Jeanne Crain (dubbed by Louanne Hogan), Linda Darnell (dubbed), Barbara Whiting, Buddy Swan, Constance Bennett and Walter Brennan

All Through the Day
Music by Jerome Kern
Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Sung by Larry Stevens, Jeanne Crain (dubbed by Louanne Hogan), Linda Darnell (dubbed), William Eythe (dubbed by David Street) and Cornel Wilde (dubbed by Ben Gage)

In Love in Vain
Music by Jerome Kern
Lyrics by Leo Robin
Sung by Jeanne Crain (dubbed by Louanne Hogan) and William Eythe (dubbed by David Street)

Cinderella Sue
Music by Jerome Kern
Lyrics by E.Y. Harburg
Sung and danced by Avon Long and children

"Two Hearts Are Better Than One" (music by Jerome Kern, lyrics by Johnny Mercer), intended for this film, was not used. Columbia Records issued Frank Sinatra's version of the song.
At the time of its release, it was felt that the film's failure was largely due to a sour 'mean streak' running through the plot, which essentially involved two generations of sisters using ruthless wiles to manipulate the men at the story's core. Particularly distasteful at the time was Constance Bennett's attempts to woo patriarch Walter Brennan away from her own sister, Dorothy Gish.
Order this rarely-seen and hard-to-find classic today for the low price of $5.99.
New Additions At Zeus:
Count Dracula (1970)

Stars: Christopher Lee, Herbert Lom, Klaus Kinski

This doggedly faithful adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel about a vampiric nobleman was helmed by cult director Jesus Franco. Despite its textual loyalty and atmospheric photography by Manuel Merino, the film -- a co-production from Spain, Italy, Germany, and Liechtenstein -- is plodding and dull. Even Christopher Lee (in an uncharacteristically weak performance as Dracula), Klaus Kinski (as the mad Renfield), and seven credited screenwriters cannot make this confused, distant film worthwhile. Cult filmmaker Bruno Mattei edited the Italian version, and scenes were later used in Calvin Floyd's In Search of Dracula.

Devil May Care (1929)

Stars: Ramon Novarro, Dorothy Jordan, Marion Harris

This romantic adventure chronicles the escapades of one of Napoleon's followers. After his leader's exile, the follower is arrested and slated for execution. He is before the firing squad, but manages to escape. To hide, he dashes into the bedroom of a bedazzling Royalist. He falls in love, but she patriotically turns him in. Again he makes a daring escape. Once again he meets the beautiful woman, who undergoes a change of heart and this time, stays loyal to the daring adventurer. Songs include: Songs: "Bon Jour," "Louie," "March of the Old Guard," "Why Waste Your Charms," "The Gang Song," "Madame Pompadour," "Charming," "If He Cared."
Sleeping Beauty (1959)

Stars: Mary Costa, Bill Shirley, Eleanor Audley

Disney produced this lavish animated fairy tale, the most expensive cartoon ever made up to its release with a budget of $6 million. When the young princess Aurora is cursed at birth by the evil fairy Maleficent, the baby is kidnapped by a trio of good fairies who raise the girl themselves, hoping to avoid the spell's fulfillment. Nevertheless, at the age of 16, the beautiful Aurora falls into a deep sleep that can only be awakened by a kiss from her betrothed, Prince Phillip. Knowing that Phillip intends to save Aurora, Maleficent takes him prisoner. When the good fairies launch a rescue attempt, Maleficent transforms herself into a spectacular fire-breathing dragon, forcing Phillip to defeat her in mortal combat. Sleeping Beauty (1959) was Oscar nominated for its musical score, which featured adaptations of Tchaikovsky compositions.


Black Christmas (1974)

Stars: Olivia Hussey, Keir Dullea, Margot Kidder

Although this Canadian production saw its widest U.S. cable TV distribution in the early '80s (primarily under the title Stranger in the House) to capitalize on the phenomenal success of Halloween and its offspring, this effective suspense-thriller actually predates John Carpenter's film by four years. The story involves a dangerous psychopath hiding out in the attic of a sorority house who torments a small group of pretty young sisters (including Olivia Hussey and Margot Kidder) who are staying behind over Christmas break. His tactics range from making obscene phone calls from their house-mother's phone, to stalking the terrified boarders with sharp objects and murderous intent. Director Bob Clark, who mistook dreariness for tension in his previous horror effort Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things! (1972), here demonstrates a tight, aggressive style that generates some very original shocks -- particularly the surprise ending -- which clearly influenced dozens of similarly-themed slasher films to follow.
'C'-Man (1949)

Stars: Dean Jagger, John Carradine, Harry Landers

In the tradition of such big-budget "docudramas" as House on 92nd Street and Call Northside 777, the modestly budgeted C-Man adopts a quasi-documentary approach to its subject matter. The "C" stands for Customs, and indeed the leading character, Cliff Holden (Dean Jagger), is a detective for the U.S. Customs Department. Against a backdrop of genuine New York locations (with a few rather obvious back-projected shots thrown in), Holden puts the heat on a homicidal jewelry smuggler. John Carradine steals the show as an alcoholic doctor, reduced to fronting for the smugglers. The rest of the cast is populated with such Broadway regulars as Edith Atwater and Walter Brooke. Though it obviously cost next to nothing to produce, C-Man is far more atmospheric and suspenseful than many a major-studio effort.

Billion Dollar Brain (1967)

Stars: Michael Caine, Karl Malden, Ed Begley

Harry Palmer (Michael Caine), the reluctant secret agent from The Ipcress File (1965) and Funeral in Berlin (1966) -- both (like the source for this movie) based on novels by Len Deighton -- is back again in Ken Russell's Billion Dollar Brain. Having left Britain's espionage service, Palmer is scraping out a living as a private investigator, but he's still willing to give his old boss Colonel Ross (Guy Doleman) the bum's rush out of his office when he comes calling, offering a raise and promotion if he'll return. But Palmer ends up working for Her Majesty's government anyway -- a letter arrives, with a key and money, and telephoned instructions by a mechanical voice connect him up with a carefully sealed parcel (filled with what an x-ray reveals as eggs) that he must transport to Helsinki. No sooner does he get there than he discovers that an old friend, Leo Newbigin (Karl Malden), and his young lover Anya (Françoise Dorléac) are behind the trip, and that the man who was supposed to receive the parcel is dead. The eggs contain dangerous viruses stolen from a secret British laboratory, and England wants them back and wants to know why they were stolen. That assignment immerses Palmer in a deadly game of deception, double-dealing, and triple-crosses on all sides, as he finds that Leo is working for a privately operated intelligence network, set up by a rabidly right-wing Texas oil man, General Midwinter (Ed Begley Sr.). The billion-dollar super-computer of the title, built by Midwinter, runs a network of spies and assassins aimed at the destruction of the Soviet Union. That interests Palmer's old friend, Soviet security chief Colonel Stok (Oskar Homolka, in an almost movie-stealing performance), very much, and he, too, wants to know what Palmer knows. And then there's Leo, who has taken millions from Midwinter, supposedly to establish a secret underground in Latvia, waiting for the signal to rise up against the Soviets occupying their country that will spread across the Baltics and beyond and bring down the Soviet government. He's taken the money, but all Harry find when he goes into Latvia is motley bunch of broken-down black marketeers whose orders are to kill him and make it look like the work of the Soviets. And there's Anya, who is sleeping with Leo, trying to seduce Harry, and seems to have an agenda all her own, but in whose interest? If it's all a little confusing, so was the book on which it was based, but there's enough striking visual material, courtesy of cinematographer Billy Williams, and engrossing performances (and a wry sensibility), courtesy of director Ken Russell and screenwriter John McGrath, that the leaps in plot, logic, and setting don't matter that much, and it is great fun. 

James Garner

Alan Ladd

John Payne

Joan Blondell

Vince Edwards

Rock Hudson

George O'Brien

John Gavin

Ricardo Montalban

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