Subject: Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and June Clyde on sale for limited time




TODAY'S SPECIAL

Dance Band (1935)
Starring Charles 'Buddy' Rogers and June Clyde

Beautiful print and will play in all DVD players.
Movie star-turned-bandleader Buddy Rogers heads the cast of the British tunefest Dance Band. The star is appropriately cast as singing orchestra leader Buddy Morgan, whose great rival is female bandmaster -- or bandmistress -- Pat Shelley (June Clyde). That hero and heroine will forget their differences and fall in love is a "given," but there's many a complication along the way thanks in great part to crooked business-manager Lewes (Fred Duprez). The plot is merely a peg upon which to hang a variety of toe-tapping musical numbers, delivered with gusto by a gaggle of talented specialty artists. In addition to its entertainment obligations, Dance Band helped to introduce Austrian actor Steve Geray to English-speaking audiences; within the next few years, Geray would develop into one of Hollywood's most dependable character players.
Director: Marcel Varnel
Writers: Denis Waldock, Roger Burford, Jack Davies

Stars: Charles 'Buddy' Rogers, June Clyde, June Hart, Jack Holland, Steve Geray, Magda Kun, Fred Duprez, Hal Gordon, Fred Groves, Richard Hearne, Pickard's Chinese Syncopaters
Songs include:

Lovey Dovey
Written by Arthur Young

Valparaiso
Music by Mabel Wayne
Lyrics by Desmond Carter

Nagasaki
Music by Harry Warren
Lyrics by Mort Dixon

Chinatown, My Chinatown
Music by Jean Schwartz
Lyrics by William Jerome

Sing Song Girl
Music by James F. Hanley
Lyrics by Joseph McCarthy

Twelfth Street Rag
Music by Euday L. Bowman

Nothing fancy here, with the bonus of a 1935 British setting, Mainly it's the very appealing presence of two American performers, June Clyde, plus Buddy Roger's easygoing manner, that makes this one worthwhile. The music isn't bad, either. I'm curious where these programmers played in the US, since they were pretty much a rare kind of thing--a "B" imported British musical.
Another dubious attraction is one hell of a scary dance team in the middle of it (the female looks like an anorexic Cruella DeVille), but aside from that it's the one time we will probably ever see The Chinese Syncopators!
Charles 'Buddy' Rogers resumes the boyish smile and mannerisms that he employed so successfully a few years ago. Rather more successful as a musician than as a romantic actor, he displays his versatility by playing almost every instrument in his jazz orchestra with skill. The story concerns two rival band leaders, Mr. Rogers and June Clyde, who meet under amusing if rather shopworn circumstances...The music includes an excellent number called the Valparaiso.
Order this rarely-seen and hard-to-find classic today for the low price of $5.99.
New Additions At Zeus:
Billy The Kid Trapped (1942)

Stars: Buster Crabbe, Al St. John, Malcolm 'Bud' McTaggart

After Billy, Fuzzy and Jeff are rescued from a hanging by mysterious strangers, the countryside if terrorized by three men, posing as Billy, Fuzzy and Jeff. Sheriff Masters puts Billy and his pals on the trail of the impostors. The trail leads to Mesa City, an outlaw town run by Jim Stanton, under whose orders, three killers, Montana, Pete and Curly, have been robbing and murdering, disguised as Billy and his two sidekicks. Billy brings in the impostors but they are released by crooked-judge Clarke. Stanton makes henchman Red Barton the new sheriff, with orders to get Billy. Again assuming their disguises, Montana, Pete and Curly rob the stagecoach. And Billy, Fuzzy and Jeff have to begin again in the process of clearing their own names.

Expensive Women (1931)

Stars: Dolores Costello, H.B. Warner, Warren William

A woman in love with a composer stands trial for another man.
Madame X (1966)

Stars: Lana Turner, John Forsythe, Ricardo Montalban

Lana Turner takes the lead in the seventh film version of Alexandre Bisson's glossy soap opera. Holly Parker (Turner) is married to respected diplomat Clay Anderson (John Forsythe), but his busy schedule prevents them from seeing each other very often. Distracted and lonely, Holly allows her head to be turned by carefree playboy Phil Benton (Ricardo Montalban), who dies in a freak accident during an assignation. In a panic, Holly contacts her mother-in-law, Estelle Anderson (Constance Bennett) and asks what she should do. Estelle, a joyless woman who has never cared for her daughter-in-law, tells Holly that unless she wants to destroy her husband's life and career, she should flee the country and never return. Tearfully, Holly follows Estelle's advice, leaving behind her young son. Many years later, Holly has fallen on hard times; addicted to drugs, she scrapes out a meager living as a prostitute in a cheap hotel in Mexico. Devious criminal Dan Sullivan (Burgess Meredith) tries to involve Holly in a blackmail scheme; at the last minute, she finds out that Clay is the target, and she kills Sullivan. She cannot afford to hire a lawyer to defend her, so she is assigned a dedicated young public defender, whom she soon recognizes as her son, Clay Anderson, Jr. (Keir Dullea). Not wanting Clay, Jr. to know her true identity, Holly is tried as "Madame X," but she has trouble keeping her composure given the trial and her mixed joy and shame at seeing her son. Madame X was Constance Bennett's first film in 12 years and the last she would ever make; she died of a cerebral hemorrhage shortly after completing her work on the picture, nine months before it was released.


Bunny Lake Is Missing (1965)

Stars: Keir Dullea, Carol Lynley, Laurence Olivier

Based on the mystery novel by Marryam Modell (using the pseudonym Evelyn Piper), Bunny Lake Is Missing is a bizarre study in motherhood, kindness, enigma, and insanity. Ann Lake (Carol Lynley), an American freshly relocated to England, wishes to drop off her daughter Bunny for the girl's first day at a new nursery school. Oddly, Ann cannot locate any teachers or administrators, only the school's disgruntled cook (Lucie Mannheim). She is forced to leave Bunny unsupervised in the building's "first day" room, under the reassurance that the cook will be responsible for the child. When Ann returns in the afternoon, the cook has quit and Bunny Lake is missing. The school's remaining employees vehemently deny ever seeing the child, and Ann desperately calls her older brother Stephen (Keir Dullea) for help. Ann was raised fatherless and never married; she and Bunny have lived under Stephen's care and protection for the majority of both their lives. Stephen is enraged by the irresponsibility of the staff, but as Scotland Yard begins its investigation, it comes to light that he had never officially enrolled a child at the school. When Police Superintendent Newhouse (Laurence Olivier) begins to unravel the Lakes' lives and search their belongings, he discovers that not only did Ann once have an imaginary childhood daughter named "Bunny," but that the young Bunny seemed to have no tangible possessions at the Lake apartment. Bunny Lake (whom we have yet to see onscreen) may not be missing: she may not even be real. Terrified that Newhouse will now abandon the search for the girl, the hysterical Ann sets out to prove her sanity and, in the process, surprisingly uncovers the true psychosis behind the disappearance of her little Bunny Lake.
Mail Order Bride (1964)

Stars: Buddy Ebsen, Keir Dullea, Lois Nettleton

Many viewers avoided Mail Order Bride upon its first release, assuming (thanks to MGM's shoddy promotional campaign) that the picture had been slapped together to capitalize on the popularity of Beverly Hillbillies star Buddy Ebsen. In truth, the film is an engaging and involving western drama, with Ebsen playing a character far removed from Jed Clampett. The mail order bride in question is not for Ebsen but for the wild young frontiersman in his charge (Keir Dullea). It is Buddy's hope that the girl will tame the boy (the son of an old friend) and give him some sense of responsibility. Lois Nettelton is the proper young lady who fills the bill. In the closing scenes, director Burt Kennedy restages the climactic shootout from 1962's Ride the High Country, which Kennedy scripted. Mail Order Bride is not only a satisfactory vehicle for Buddy Ebsen, but it also allows him an opportunity to sing the title song. 

David And Lisa (1962)

Stars: Keir Dullea, Janet Margolin, Howard Da Silva

This stark and spare look at the world of the mentally disturbed was one of the beacons of the new American independent film movement. Keir Dullea and Janet Margolin star as two adolescents who make contact with each other in a home for disturbed youngsters. Dullea is David Clemens, who is placed in the home by his mother because of his constant fear of being touched. Margolin is Lisa, a 15-year-old schizophrenic who speaks only in rhyme, when she speaks at all. David rejects the help of psychiatrist Alan Swinford (Howard Da Silva) but makes an emotional connection with Lisa. Because of his contact with Lisa, David eventually opens up to Swinford and his mother. But his mother is dissatisfied with his progress and takes him back home. Home life, however, consists of his mother's domineering ways and parental quarrels, so David runs away and returns to the home for disturbed youngsters. But then an argument with Lisa leads to a climactic confrontation. 

James Garner

Alan Ladd

John Payne

Joan Blondell

Rock Hudson

George O'Brien

John Gavin

Ricardo Montalban

Richard Chamberlain

Khwaja Ahmad Abbas

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