Subject: Anthony Hopkins and Jack Hawkins on sale for limited time


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TODAY'S SPECIAL

When Eight Bells Toll (1971)
Starring Anthony Hopkins and Jack Hawkins

Beautiful print and will play in all DVD players.
Anthony Hopkins stars in this adventure yarn, scripted by Alistair MacLean. Hopkins is Philip Calvert, a water-logged James Bond. Calvert plays a naval secret-service agent who is assigned to find out why millions of pounds of gold bullion are being stolen under the noses of the British government. Calvert begins his investigations in the bleak Scottish Highlands. Posing as marine biologists, Calvert and his partner Hunslett (Corin Redgrave) find something fishy and hostile among the Scottish inhabitants. They also suspect that the rich and smooth Greek tycoon Sir Arthur Skouras (Jack Hawkins), who lays anchor off the coast in his luxury yacht, may be the culprit behind the pirating of the gold bullion. Calvert and Hunslett look to be wrapping up the case, but then Charlotte (Nathalie Delon) appears. Supposedly Sir Arthur's wife, she ends up dropping her guard and agrees to help Calvert in the retrieval of the gold.
Director: Etienne Périer
Writer: Alistair MacLean (screenplay)

Stars: Anthony Hopkins, Jack Hawkins, Robert Morley, Nathalie Delon, Corin Redgrave, Derek Bond
First top-billed lead role for Sir Anthony Hopkins.
Sir Anthony Hopkins and Production Secretary Jennifer Lynton met while making this picture and were later married.
The term "Eight bells" is a nautical reference to the hour of midnight. It is also a nautical euphemism indicating "finished" as well as an expression stating the end of a sailor's watch (as in an obituary).
Elliott Kastner offered Orson Welles the role of Sir Anthony Skouras. The deal was forty thousand dollars for one week's work, with an extra five thousand dollars for living expenses. Jack Hawkins would eventually play the part.
Order this rarely-seen and hard-to-find classic today for the low price of $5.99.
New Additions At Zeus:
Beau Geste (1939)

Stars: Gary Cooper, Ray Milland, Robert Preston

This second of three movie versions of P.C. Wren's adventure novel Beau Geste is a virtual scene-for-scene remake of the 1927 silent version. We open on the now-famous scenes of a remote, burning desert fort, manned by the dead Foreign Legionnaires, then flash back to the early lives of the Geste brothers. As children, the Gestes swear eternal loyalty to one another and to their family. One of the boys, young Beau (played as a youth by Donald O'Connor), witnesses his beloved aunt (Heather Thatcher) apparently stealing a valuable family jewel in order to finance the Geste home; Beau chooses to remain silent rather than disgrace his aunt. Years later, the grown Beau (Gary Cooper) again protects his aunt by confessing to the theft and running off to join the Foreign Legion. He is joined in uniform by faithful brothers John (Ray Milland) and Digby (Robert Preston), who in turn are pursued by a slimy thief (J. Carroll Naish). The crook is in cahoots with sadistic Legion Sgt. Markov (Brian Donlevy, in one of the most hateful portrayals ever captured on celluloid), who is later put in charge of Fort Zinderneuf, where Beau and John are stationed. When the Arabs attack, Markov proves himself a valiant soldier; it is he who hits upon the idea of convincing the Arabs that the fort is still fully manned by propping up the corpses of the casualties at the guard posts. Beau is seriously wounded, and while the greedy Markov searches for the jewel supposedly hidden on Beau's person, he is held at bay by loyal John. The suddenly enervated Beau kills Markov, then dies himself--but not before entrusting two notes to John, one of which requests that John give Beau the "Viking funeral" he'd always wanted (this is why the fort is in flames at the beginning of the film). After the battle, Digby Geste, a bugler with the relief troops, comes upon Beau's dead body, and appropriates the notes. As it turns out, John Geste is the only one who survives to return to England. He gives his aunt Beau's letter, which explains why Beau had confessed and run off--"a 'beau geste', indeed" comments his tearful aunt. No one missed nominal leading lady Susan Hayward in this essentially all-male entertainment.
Woman Trap (1929)

Stars: Hal Skelly, Chester Morris, Evelyn Brent

Although Broadway star Hal Skelly never quite made it in films, it wasn't for lack of trying. In Woman Trap, Skelly is cast against type as hard-bitten police sergeant Dan Malone, whose mission in life is to rid his community of gangsters. The revelation that Dan's own brother Ray (Chester Morris) is the secret head of all local criminal activities does not weaken Dan's resolve in the least. The barely relevant title is a reference to "heroine" Kitty Evans (Evelyn Brent), the wife of a minor gang functionary. Screenwriter Joseph L. Mankiewicz, presumably on a dare, makes a brief appearance as a crime reporter. Woman Trap was an expansion of a one-act vaudeville sketch by Edwin Burke.
2010 (1984)

Stars: Roy Scheider, John Lithgow, Helen Mirren

This belated sequel to Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) is directed by Peter Hyams. Roy Scheider plays the astronaut/skipper of a U.S.-Soviet space mission, sent to find out what happened to the missing Discovery flight that carried Keir Dullea into the beyond in the original 2001. Scheider's polyglot crew includes Americans John Lithgow and Bob Balaban (the latter a computer whiz, responsible for the notorious HAL 9000) and Russians Helen Mirren, Elya Baskin and Natasha Schneider. The reason for this international mixture is that the world is on the brink of nuclear war, and it is hoped that the space mission will assure east-west solidarity (in this respect, 2010 dates far more than 2001, given the collapse of the Iron Curtain). When the astronauts catch up with Dullea, still in orbit around Jupiter, producer/director/writer Hyams attempts to demystify the enigmatic climax of 2001. Arthur C. Clarke, author of the story upon which 2001 was based, appears in 2010 as a man on a park bench. Incidentally, the voice-over credited to Olga Mallsnerd is actually Candice Bergen. (The name Mallsnerd is a play on the name of one of the characters created by her ventriloquist father Edgar.)
3 Sailors And A Girl (1953)

Stars: Jane Powell, Gordon MacRae, Gene Nelson

Though it isn't obvious at first glance, Three Sailors and a Girl is the fourth screen version of the George S. Kaufman stage comedy The Butter and Egg Man. The titular gobs are Jones, Twitch, and Parky, played respectively by Gordon MacRae, Gene Nelson, and Jack E. Leonard. On leave in New York with their pockets full of money, our trio of heroes are convinced by wheeler-dealer Joe Woods (Sam Levene) to invest their money in a musical show. It soon becomes obvious that the boys have backed a turkey, but with the help of pert leading-lady Penny (Jane Powell), a potential disaster is converted into a smashing success. The Sammy Cahn-Sammy Fain musical score is tuneful, while LeRoy Prinz' choreography is first-rate. A cute celebrity cameo appearance caps this happy little film.
CHRISTMAS MOVIES!!
Miracle On 34th Street (1973)

Stars: Sebastian Cabot, Jane Alexander, David Hartman

The 1947 film comedy Miracle on 34th Street starred Edmund Gwenn as a bearded gentleman named Kris Kringle, who was convinced that he was the genuine Santa Claus. The earlier Miracle was good enough as it stood, so why remake it? Still, the full-color 1973 Miracle on 34th Street has the considerable advantage of Sebastian Cabot, his trademarked beard dyed snowy white, as Kringle, so it isn't as bad as expected. The story, which involves the commercial and legal ramifications of the "real" Santa taking a job as a department store Santa at Macy's, was barely updated for the 1970s, meaning that several of the plot devices--including a nasty psychiatrist who has Kringle committed--were somewhat anachronistic. The uplifting final scene, wherein a cynical little girl becomes a true believer of Santa Claus (as do the adults in the story), still works well in the remake, even though Suzanne Davidson isn't in the same league as the original Miracle's Natalie Wood. The TV-movie version of Miracle on 34th Street wasn't too successful, but that didn't stop John Hughes from churning out a second remake in 1994.
A Smoky Mountain Christmas (1986)

Stars: Dolly Parton, Lee Majors, Bo Hopkins

Smoky Mountain Christmas is the sort of fare that always seems to pop up exclusively during the Yuletide season: an original made-for-TV musical fantasy. Dolly Parton plays a country-music star (imaginative casting, this) who finds herself stranded in the Tennessee backwoods with taciturn mountaineer Lee Majors. Parton also touches base with seven orphaned young'uns...and a witch (Anita Morris). John Ritter makes an uncredited cameo appearance as the judge who presides over the inevitable climactic adoption proceedings. First broadcast December 14, 1986 (directly opposite the ratings-grabbing The Promise), A Smoky Mountain Christmas was directed "con brio" by Henry Winkler.
A Christmas Memory (1966)

Stars: Geraldine Page, Donnie Melvin, Lavinia Cassels

Its the last Christmas together in Depression era Alabama of a sensitive boy and his elderly cousin who was his closest friend. The two raise enough money to buy the ingredients for 30 fruit cakes, sent mostly to strangers like FDR. They spend Christmas day flying the kites they made for each other while Capote's voice over explains their separation, followed by their dog's passing, and a few years later her's.
An Old-Fashioned Christmas (1965)

Stars: John Raitt, The Columbus Boychoir, Jacques d'Amboise

Martha Scott, opens with a tableau set in a small town in 1909. Townspeople gradually leave their still-frame poses, coming to life to sing holiday tunes. Melissa Hayden, as the Snow Queen, and Jacques D'Amboise, as the Prince, perform the "Snow" pas de deux from "The Nutcracker," with music by Tchaikovsky. The ensemble of singers perform carols in "Grandma's house," followed by a Christmas message from Frederick R. Kappel. A church scene with the Columbus Boychoir singing "Adeste Fideles," "The First Noel," and "Carol of the Bells". Martha Scott reads a biblical passage from Luke. Gianna d'Angelo and the Boychoir close singing "O Holy Night" and "Silent Night".
Loretta Young

Robert Mitchum

Robert Ryan

Robert Taylor

Robert Wagner

Ronald Reagan

Stanley Baker

Tony Curtis

Tyrone Power

Victor Mature

William Holden

James Franciscus

Marion Davies

Keir Dullea

Brett Clark

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