Subject: Bing Crosby and Fred MacMurray on sale for limited time




TODAY'S SPECIAL

Sing, You Sinners (1938)
Starring Bing Crosby and Fred MacMurray

Beautiful print and will play in all DVD players.
Chronic gambler Joe Beebe (Bing Crosby) is a source of great consternation for his loving mother (Elizabeth Patterson), who wishes that Joe would follow the example of his responsible, strait-laced brother David (Fred MacMurray). Meanwhile, the youngest member of the Beebe clan, 13-year-old Mike Beebe (Donald O'Connor, in his first major film role) unabashedly hero-worships the wastrelly Joe. It so happens that all three brothers are talented musicians, but only Joe has star quality. Heading to Los Angeles to seek his fortune, Joe promises that he'll send for the rest of his family when he makes good. Inspired by the glowing reports of his success in L.A., Mother Beebe sells everything she owns and heads to the coast--only to discover that the prodigal Joe has spent every penny he's earned on a long-shot race horse. While Joe tries to groom the nag for the big money--with Mike as the jockey--middle brother David arrives in L.A., prepared to knock some sense into Joe's head. As things turn out, the brothers join forces to thwart a bunch of race-fixing gangsters, segueing into the long-delayed happy ending. Heavily touted as the first film in which Bing Crosby played a "serious" role (which it really wasn't) Sing You Sinners is best known today for introducing the hit songs "Small Fry" and "I've Got a Pocketful of Dreams."
Director: Wesley Ruggles
Writers: Claude Binyon, Claude Binyon

Stars: Bing Crosby, Fred MacMurray, Donald O'Connor, Elizabeth Patterson, Ellen Drew, John Gallaudet, William Haade, Paul White, Irving Bacon, Tom Dugan, Herbert Corthell
Songs include:

SHALL WE GATHER AT THE RIVER
Traditional hymn,
Written by Robert Lowry
Sung by cast

SING YOU, SINNERS
Music by W. Franke Harling
Lyrics by Sam Coslow
Played briefly during the opening credits

DON'T LET THAT MOON GET AWAY
Music by James V. Monaco
Lyrics by Johnny Burke
Sung by Bing Crosby

I'VE GOT A POCKETFUL OF DREAMS
Music by James V. Monaco
Lyrics by Johnny Burke
Sung by Bing Crosby, Fred MacMurray, Donald O'Connor
Reprised by Bing Crosby, Fred MacMurray, Donald O'Connor and Elizabeth Patterson

LAUGH AND CALL IT LOVE
Music by James V. Monaco
Lyrics by Johnny Burke
Sung by Bing Crosby, Fred MacMurray, Donald O'Connor

SMALL FRY
Music by Hoagy Carmichael
Lyrics by Frank Loesser
Sung by Bing Crosby, Fred MacMurray, Donald O'Connor

National Board of Review, USA 1938
Winner
NBR Award Top Ten Films

The role of Mike Beebe, played by Donald O'Connor, was originally meant for Mickey Rooney. But Rooney was scheduled to make another picture at the same time.
Initially the film was to be titled "The Unholy Beebes" and then "Harmony for Three" before finishing with "Sing You Sinners". Filming took place in April/May 1938 in Hollywood. Race track scenes were filmed at the Pomona Fairgrounds and at Santa Anita using two dozen of Crosby's horses. Sing You Sinners was premiered on August 5, 1938 at the Del Mar racetrack with the New York premiere taking place on August 16.
The three Beebe brothers are talented singers looking to make their way in the world. Joe Beebe (Bing Crosby) is a chronic gambler and a source of great consternation for his loving mother (Elizabeth Patterson), who only wishes he would follow the example of his responsible brother David (Fred MacMurray), who postpones his marriage to Martha Randall (Ellen Drew) regularly because Joe cannot support the family. Mike Beebe (Donald O'Connor), the youngest of the three brothers, idolizes his gambler brother and wants to grow up to be just like him. While Joe is always looking for an angle, convinced his only road to success is through gambling, David prefers working in his garage and dreams of the day he can afford to marry Martha.
After losing his new job at the local gas station for trading gas for rummage articles, Joe travels to Los Angeles and soon wins money at the racetrack. Using the money to purchase a swap shop, Joe then trades the store for a racehorse named Uncle Gus. After Joe sends back home glowing reports of his success, Mother Beebe and Mike travel out to California and stay with him. Later, David and Martha also travel to Los Angeles and are shocked to see the rest of their family living on the brink of poverty because of Joe's laziness. Forced once again to postpone his wedding, David sends Martha back home.
With no money coming in, Mother Beebe forces her sons to use their musical training and go to work as a singing trio at a nightclub. Meanwhile, young Mike has been chosen to ride in a big race as Uncle Gus' jockey. One of their competitors, Harry Ringmer (John Gallaudet), bribes the thirteen-year-old into losing the race. Later, when Mike reveals the arrangement to Joe, the older brother reassures him and advises him to race to win. After Mike and Uncle Gus win the race, Ringmer and one of his thugs confront Mike and Joe and beat them up. David and Mother Beebe come to their rescue, and the fight continues until Ringmer and his thug give up.
With enough money to pay their debts, David tries to quit the singing group, but his mother insists that they all keep their steady singing jobs, and her sons agree. David sends Martha a telegram asking her to come back to "marry the four of them", and the three Beebe brothers continue their singing career.
Bosley Crowther writing in The New York Times liked it. "The happily accidental conjunction of Bing Crosby and horse racing (which is Bing’s other love, besides crooning, as you may have read somewhere) has turned out to be the funniest comedy on Broadway, including all the side streets. The only noteworthy difference between reality and Sing You Sinners at the Paramount, is that in the movies Crosby’s horse wins—an unprecedented thing which may be explained by the fact that Bing undoubtedly must have had a hand in the script....Claude Binyon’s story and Wesley Ruggles’ direction are swell, and the two principal songs, “I’ve Got a Pocketful of Dreams” and “Don’t Let That Moon Get Away” are already being whistled about town. Incidentally, that’s another thing we like about Sing You Sinners: not too much singing."
Order this rarely-seen and hard-to-find classic today for the low price of $5.99.
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BEEFCAKE!

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